Purl Back Backwards

As I was knitting down the body of my last Saddle Up pullover, I was thinking about the Bottom Edge. I find they are always a bit tricky. I don’t want this Bottom Border to pull in. It’s for my son and he likes his garments loose, like an over-sized hoodie.

I could work it in garter stitch, round and round, which is what I did in the pattern but, well, I just did that, so what else could I do? I could work it in ribbing to match the ribbed neckband but I had a lot of time to think about it, and this is what I came up with: garter stitch worked back and forth with an SSK to attach to the open stitches at the bottom of the pullover.

I really like how it looks and it’s not pulling in.

As you know, garter stitch is worked back and forth and can be a real pain if you have to turn a garment over and over again to work the right and wrong side rows. Knitting back backwards to the rescue. No turning. The right side of the fabric is facing you all the time. Have you ever done this? It takes some practice for sure.

Knit the right side rows as usual. For the wrong side row you need to work purl stitches on the right side of the fabric. Here we go. With the right side facing and the yarn at the front …

… insert left needle into the next stitch, from back to front.

The left needle is sitting in front now. Wrap the yarn around the left needle counter-clockwise. Take the yarn under the left needle to the back, over the needle to the front again. I’m a continental knitter so the yarn is coming from my left hand but this can also be done with the yarn in your right hand.

Now, to finish I flip the part of the stitch on my right needle forward over the tip of the left needle. If you have the yarn in your right hand, you might push the left needle back through the stitch to finish up.

Ta, da, one purl stitch made.

I have to pay attention to do this but it is getting easier and easier as I work around the bottom of this Saddle Up pullover.

Here’s to learning something new. Cheers, Deb

Any Gauge and Gauge-Free knitting patterns by Deb

It’s a new year

I am coming to you from my local library since our internet at home went out before Christmas and now won’t be up for another couple weeks. We’ve been reading lots of books. Not a bad thing but it’s somewhat unsettling to be without the world wide web.

But look, I finished my Saddle Up pullover. Yahoo.

I would have liked to make the neckband deeper but I ran out of wool. I bought it in Scotland about 30 years ago so … there is no more. Yes, it was a deep dive into my stash but I’m so glad to finally have a sweater out of it. Ha, ha, about time, wouldn’t you say!

Did you make a knitting New Years resolution?

This is my New Years resolution for 2022: knit only from my stash. I’ve unfollowed all wool dryers from my Instagram account so I won’t be tempted. Ugh, that was really hard to do. How about you? Do you have knitting plans for the new year?

It’s a new year. All the best to you and yours in 2022. Cheers, Deb

Any Gauge and Gauge-Free patterns by Deb: https://www.ravelry.com/stores/debgemmellmods

Cables, worked flat to in-the-round

A drop shoulder pullover can be knit in a combination of knit-in-the-round and knit flat, whether it’s knit from the top down or the bottom up. If you add cables to the pattern, like in the Saddle Up pullover, well, it gets a little trickier.

Cable patterns are almost always written to be worked flat, with a right side and a wrong side. The cable crossings are worked on the right side rows. This simplifies things a little bit. You know those right side rows are the ones to watch out for.

At some point, you may need to work in-the-round. Then, you have the right side facing you all the time. Figuring out when to cross cables can be a little more difficult.

Here is a 4-stitch cable, where two stitches are crossed over two stitches, every 4 rows. The lines in the photo indicate the outside stitch of this Left Cross. See that hole just to the left of the crossing stitches? That’s caused by the crossing. (On a right cross cable, the hole would be on the right of the cable.)

When this cable is worked flat, there is a Right Side Row where you worked the cable cross, followed by a wrong side row, right side row and one more wrong side row. On the next Right Side row you would work a new cable cross.

When you work in-the-round you only have the Right Side facing you. Then you have Round 1 where you cross the cable, followed by Rounds 2, 3 & 4. Then cross again.

If you put something straight into the hole created by the crossing and run it under the horizontal bars to the needle, you should see the 4 bars. I used a sewing up needle but your cable needle may be handy and it would work great.

When you can count 4 bars, you are ready to cross again on the next round. If you have a 6 stitch cable, crossing every 8 rows/rounds, you would work until you can count 8 bars from the hole created by the last crossing. It works.

Cheers, Deb

Any Gauge and Gauge-Free patterns by Deb

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